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Chia Seed Bowl
Chia seeds make a great egg substitute in SOME recipes. It is because of the seed’s amazing gelling property, that they can stand in for another, totally different ingredient. The soluble fiber on the outside of the seed shell, when exposed to filtered water, makes a thick, clear gel. This soft, thick, flavorless substance feels much like the white of an uncooked egg. However, instead of being made by an animal, it is made only by plant fiber.

Why would you want to use chia gel to replace your eggs?

Vegetarian reasons: Don’t agree with how egg-laying chickens are treated? Substitute out their eggs wherever possible by using chia gel. Cost reasons: Free range eggs too expensive? Problem of the week making the price of eggs go up? The chia egg replacer method saves money because every ONE tablespoon of dry chia seeds makes NINE tablespoons of chia gel, every time. No yolks to get in the way, and the price doesn’t go up and down with the general health of the egg market. Nutrition reasons: Chia is loaded with nutrition. It has complete protein like that found in meat, healthy omega 3 oils, no cholesterol, more calcium by weight than milk, magnesium & boron to help you absorb that calcium, plus 2 kinds of fiber (soluble & insoluble) while regular eggs are fiber free. Why is chia superior to a “flax egg”? You may have heard of a ‘flax egg’ too, where flax seeds are exposed to water, then added to the recipe. Flax seeds have a limited gelling capability. They have some soluble fiber on the outside of their shell. However, whole, intact flax seeds aren’t well digested by the human body. Their nutrition is inside, so if you can’t break them open, you don’t get many benefits. Flax is easy to grind (even a home coffee grinder will do it) but, if you grind it, you lose much of the gelling ability. You can’t have it both ways with the flax seed, but you can, with the chia seed.
What should you consider when using chia as an egg substitute? In many recipes, the egg is used as a ‘glue’, a viscous thicker-than-water substance that helps bind ingredients together. That’s what makes egg & chia gel work in a similar way. Look over the recipe first, and then decide if chia gel is an appropriate choice. Obviously, chia can’t replace eggs in all situations and recipes. You’re never going to have scrambled chia, nor a chia omelet. You also can’t use it where the item rises on whipped egg whites, or relies upon them for lightness of texture. You can’t use chia to replace the butter AND the egg in a recipe. You have to choose one or the other. You can’t separate the gel from the seed, so whatever you make will have little dots (the tiny chia seeds) as a part of its look. Chia gel (and seeds) have no flavor, so it’s not going to interfere with the taste recipe Chia seeds are quite small, they won’t change the texture of the food, it’s not like finding crunchy sunflower seeds in your cookie or cake
Chia Egg Substitute Banner Egg Replacement How-to Side Chia Gel & Eggs- Food Binder Photo
Will it work for your recipe? Give the considerations above some thought, then give it a try! If you can’t replace the egg, maybe you can substitute out half of the butter or oil instead? Remember, doing so generally does not change the look, taste, texture or baking method of the food--it just lowers the fat!
How To Use Chia Seeds As An Egg Substitute: It’s so easy! The ratio is: For Every 1 Egg Use 2 Tablespoons of Chia Gel That’s all there is to it! To make chia seed gel, just add 9 tablespoons of filtered  water to 1 tablespoon of chia seeds, shake or stir in a re-seal-able container, and wait about 15 minutes. Chia gel will keep for about 1 week in a closed container. The ratio for making gel is always 9 parts water to 1 part seeds, so you can always make as much as you need. That means chia is a great value too! A little goes along way when you’re making gel.

You may know about chia seed gel as a substitute for butter or oil in baked recipes, but did you

know, it can also be a great egg substitute too?

Learn how, why & when to use chia gel as an egg substitute in your recipes!

MySeeds Chia
© 2008 DBA Design Action MySeeds Chia
Chia Seed Bowl

You may know about chia seed gel as a

substitute for butter or oil in baked recipes,

but did you know, it can also be a great egg

substitute too?

Chia seeds make a great egg substitute in SOME recipes. It is because of the seed’s amazing gelling property, that they can stand in for another, totally different ingredient. The soluble fiber on the outside of the seed shell, when exposed to filtered water, makes a thick, clear gel. This soft, thick, flavorless substance feels much like the white of an uncooked egg. However, instead of being made by an animal, it is made only by plant fiber.
Chia Egg Substitute Banner Chia Gel & Eggs- Food Binder Photo
How To Use Chia Seeds As An Egg Substitute: It’s so easy! The ratio is: For Every 1 Egg Use 2 Tablespoons of Chia Gel That’s all there is to it! To make chia seed gel, just add 9 tablespoons of filtered water to 1 tablespoon of chia seeds, shake or stir in a re-seal-able container, and wait about 15 minutes. Chia gel will keep for about 1 week in a closed container. The ratio for making gel is always 9 parts water to 1 part seeds, so you can always make as much as you need. That means chia is a great value too! A little goes a long way when you’re making gel.

Why would you want to use chia gel to

replace your eggs?

Vegetarian reasons: Don’t agree with how egg-laying chickens are treated? Substitute out their eggs wherever possible by using chia gel. Cost reasons: Free range eggs too expensive? Problem of the week making the price of eggs go up? The chia egg replacer method saves money because every ONE tablespoon of dry chia seeds makes NINE tablespoons of chia gel, every time. No yolks to get in the way, and the price doesn’t go up and down with the general health of the egg market. Nutrition reasons: Chia is loaded with nutrition. It has complete protein like that found in meat, healthy omega 3 oils, no cholesterol, more calcium by weight than milk, magnesium & boron to help you absorb that calcium, plus 2 kinds of fiber (soluble & insoluble) while regular eggs are fiber free. Why is chia superior to a “flax egg”? You may have heard of a ‘flax egg’ too, where flax seeds are exposed to water, then added to the recipe. Flax seeds have a limited gelling capability. They have some soluble fiber on the outside of their shell. However, whole, intact flax seeds aren’t well digested by the human body. Their nutrition is inside, so if you can’t break them open, you don’t get many benefits. Flax is easy to grind (even a home coffee grinder will do it) but, if you grind it, you lose much of the gelling ability. You can’t have it both ways with the flax seed, but you can, with the chia seed.
What should you consider when using chia as an egg substitute? In many recipes, the egg is used as a ‘glue’, a viscous thicker-than- water substance that helps bind ingredients together. That’s what makes egg & chia gel work in a similar way. Look over the recipe first, and then decide if chia gel is an appropriate choice. Obviously, chia can’t replace eggs in all situations and recipes. You’re never going to have scrambled chia, nor a chia omelet. You also can’t use it where the item rises on whipped egg whites, or relies upon them for lightness of texture. You can’t use chia to replace the butter AND the egg in a recipe. You have to choose one or the other. You can’t separate the gel from the seed, so whatever you make will have little dots (the tiny chia seeds) as a part of its look. Chia gel (and seeds) have no flavor, so it’s not going to interfere with the taste recipe Chia seeds are quite small, they won’t change the texture of the food, it’s not like finding crunchy sunflower seeds in your cookie or cake
Will it work for your recipe? Give the considerations above some thought, then give it a try! If you can’t replace the egg, maybe you can substitute out half of the butter or oil instead? Remember, doing so generally does not change the look, taste, texture or baking method of the food--it just lowers the fat!